Podcast: E-Commerce for the home service industry–a growth and survival strategy. My interview with Justin Riley.

I interviewed Justin Riley in 2018 when his on-line/e-commerce platform was hitting a stride.  Since then it’s grown exponentially in both scale and profitability.  While many contractors are limited by social distancing Justin’s technology provides limitless sales and service opportunities.  This is a fantastic podcast for any business owner who is tired of cancelled serviceContinue reading “Podcast: E-Commerce for the home service industry–a growth and survival strategy. My interview with Justin Riley.”

A time management exercise for salespeople.

Let’s assume that you spend your time on three separate types of activities with three corresponding outputs. Activity/Output #1: Low leverage, low output.  These activities include disseminating information, updating clients on topics that may or may not improve their output (trip points!), and content that can be emailed, downloaded, or included in a newsletter. Activity/OutputContinue reading “A time management exercise for salespeople.”

How to Optimize Your Schedule in 99 Words.

  You have to distinguish between activity and output.  As a salesperson your activities do not always improve output.  Some activities actually impede your output.  Spending time with low output/low loyalty clients, clients who ask you to give 100% of your effort without reciprocity, or simply disseminating information are bad time management decisions.  Every hourContinue reading “How to Optimize Your Schedule in 99 Words.”

How to protect your price and improve customer loyalty in 99 words.

You can protect your price position only if you establish a value-based difference that is sustainable.  The essence of your difference must be predicated on the things you will and won’t do (your strategy requires “yes” and “no” binaries such as  ‘Yes, I will work with people with an appetite for change.’ or ‘No, IContinue reading “How to protect your price and improve customer loyalty in 99 words.”

12 Ways to Sell More in 2020 in 99 Words.

 Reduce the number of opportunities you pursue. Increase the amount of time you spend selling versus the amount of time you spend doing busywork. Improve your presentation skills. Sell the things your customers demand rather than what you supply. Treat selling as an opportunity to serve, not an an opportunity to convince. Terminate weak engagements.Continue reading “12 Ways to Sell More in 2020 in 99 Words.”

Improve your prospecting results: Pattern recognition.

The world’s best chess players don’t play move-by-move chess.  There’s no “10 moves ahead” aspect of their games.  Chess, like life, is too organic and the best laid plans of mice and men often go awry.  Instead, the world’s best study patterns and use their prodigious gifts to memorize the most successful responses to theseContinue reading “Improve your prospecting results: Pattern recognition.”

How to sell more in 2020: Improve your presentation skills.

“Technology is a glittering lure.  But there’s the rare occasion when the public can be engaged on a level beyond flash.” — Don Draper An expertly crafted, deftly delivered product pitch is one of a salesperson’s most important assets.  Yet it’s easy to forget that educating a customer and inspiring a customer to the pointContinue reading “How to sell more in 2020: Improve your presentation skills.”

5 Critical Questions to Ask When Prospecting.

The questions a salesperson asks during a prospecting process should provide insights regarding the prospect’s attitude and willingness to make a change from one supplier to another.  For example:  In terms of time, money, and risk, what business problems will working with us solve for you? (the prospect self-selects financial, structural, or security concerns thatContinue reading “5 Critical Questions to Ask When Prospecting.”

An argument for collaboration: Technology is erasing the lines between inside and outside sales teams.

Inside sales teams and outside sales teams have traditionally sold in different ways.  Inside sales teams sold over the phone or fax or walk-in orders.  Face-to-face interaction with customers was transactional and generally uncomplicated.  Outside sales teams sold primarily in person and were responsible for larger volume accounts.  Existing and emerging technology, however, is challengingContinue reading “An argument for collaboration: Technology is erasing the lines between inside and outside sales teams.”

Preventing Attrition Part 3: Not Every Customer is a Good Customer

Attrition happens when companies underestimate the importance of customer selection.  Sales teams often spend time and money on customers who don’t share the same strategic priorities–the things they will and won’t do to win.  Strategic misalignment results in  customers leveraging suppliers for pricing and largess with no intention of developing an authentic long-term relationship.  AContinue reading “Preventing Attrition Part 3: Not Every Customer is a Good Customer”